I had a friendly conversation with an old pal that revolved around the challenges of having/leading a church by the thousands. Apparently, my friend believes it’s rather difficult to achieve the intimacy in a mega church setting. So since intimacy is challenged, discipleship, shepherding and the likes are challenged as well. Inevitably, church members become a bunch of chaffs.

I’m not for the numbers game but yes I am for quantity as much as I gauge quality. Quantity in a way is one measure of fruitfulness.

That being said, the question then again lies on whether an intimate community of believers by the hundreds or thousands is achievable.

Yes it is.

Acts 2 outlines a church with more than three thousand members.

Acts 2:41-47

41 …and about three thousand were added to their number that day.

42 They devoted themselves to the apostles’ teaching and to fellowship, to the breaking of bread and to prayer. 43Everyone was filled with awe at the many wonders and signs performed by the apostles. 44 All the believers were together and had everything in common. 45 They sold property and possessions to give to anyone who had need. 46Every day they continued to meet together in the temple courts. They broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts, 47 praising God and enjoying the favor of all the people. And the Lord added to their number daily those who were being saved.

That in place the question now centers on how it was done.

They devoted themselves to:

Apostles teaching – Bible reading, podcasts, services..

Fellowship – Meaningful relationship with discernible purpose and goal..

Breaking of the bread – Communion. Reminding ourselves of the cross of Jesus..

Prayer – Devotions, quiet time..

Had everything in common – Giving and generosity..

Meet together in temple courts – Small groups, discipleship

The last line of the verse seems more like an inevitable result:

And the Lord added to their number daily those who were being saved.
Footnotes:

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